Is It Right To Sack Villas-Boas

When Chelsea stumbled to another astounding defeat against West Brom on Saturday, the axe which has been hanging over Villas-Boas’ head for quite some time, must have come perilously close. There are two ways to look at the situation. Let’s have a look at both of them…

POV 1: Villas-Boas should be given more time to build his own team and it would be unjust to sack him now, with his team still having a chance to reach the Champions League positions.

POV2: Villas-Boas has had enough time and his methods are just not working out. His differences with the senior members of the team don’t look to be settling anytime soon and is creating a negative atmosphere in the team. He needs to go.

Although both the arguments seem fundamentally correct, there are other deeper issues that need to be considered before any decision is taken on Villas-Boas’ future. In Andre Villas-Boas, Chelsea have a manager who is capable of producing results, but needs a setup where he is able to flourish with his ideology of a high energy pressing game. This setup includes buying new players as well as grooming the existing ones too. His accomplishments at Porto suggest that he surely can do so and if only Abramovich could show a little patience this time around, Chelsea might reap the benefits for years to come.

Short term solutions are only going to hinder the progress of Chelsea as a club and it is the duty of the fans to make the owner realise this fact. Ever since Roman Abramovich took over at Chelsea, the focus almost entirely has been on buying proven world-class talents in a bid to win the League title and the elusive Champions League trophy. Almost no attention has been paid to develop and bring up the younger players from the academy. Only recently has Josh McEachran been allowed to get somewhere near the first team squad. In a similar time frame, Arsenal, Liverpool and Manchester United have produced outstanding young talent of the likes of Jack Wilshere, Aaron Ramsey, Wojcieh Szczesny, Tom Cleverly, Paul Pogba, Martin Kelly and Danny Welbeck. With the Financial Fair Play rules set to kick in from 2014, it has to be understood that just buying players will not be the solution.

This coming season’s transfer window is going to be a decisive one for Chelsea in more ways than one. The Chelsea camp needs to decide whether to keep the trio of John Terry, Frank Lampard and Didier Drogba or not. The three of them were responsible for the sacking of Luis Felipe Scolari and Avram Grant and are more than likely to end Villas-Boas tenure as well. The three of them have just too much power at the club and any manager who comes in has to modify his plans to accommodate them. This wasn’t such a big problem a couple of seasons back because back then all three of them were at the peak of their powers and were almost as good as anyone else in their position in the league. However in the current season, all three of them have gone down the slope (…yes I know, Lampard fans won’t agree) and need to be shipped out before they become a liability.

Villas-Boas will most probably be sacked at the end of the season, if not after the coming few games, and whoever replaces him should be prepared to face the axe as well. Rafael Benitez is most likely to succeed Villas-Boas at the moment and has a proven track record of winning titles. If not the titles, at least the Chelsea fans can hope that he will reinvigorate Fernando Torres into showing glimpses of form that influenced Abramovich to bring the Spaniard to Stamford Bridge for 50m dollars.

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